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Davidson News

Win-win for county and conservancy

The project is designed to enhance water quality long term and to reduce erosion of the stream channel. Photo Davidson Lands Conservancy

Sept. 21. Early this year, the Davidson Lands Conservancy initiated a collaboration of Davidson College professors and students, board members, supporters and the Mecklenburg County Storm Water Services to evaluate the impacts of the county’s proposed restoration of the West Branch in Fisher Farm and Abersham Parks.

This is a large-scale project that will remove most of the vegetation and significant soil in the 1.5 miles of stream corridor along the parks’ western border.

The project is designed to enhance water quality long term and to reduce erosion of the stream channel.

The group spent hundreds of hours studying the project, its impacts and alternatives. This effort yielded a revised project reducing the amount of earthworkand resulting carbon emissions—by some 30 percent and saving the county more than $1 million.

While the short-term project impacts are quite destructive, according the Davidson Land Conservancy, a number of larger trees will be preserved and larger replacement trees will be planted, thereby reducing the impact on the parks and ecosystems.

The project will likely begin early in 2023 and will take over a year complete.

The conservancy is advocating for permanent conservation of Abersham as part of the project.

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